Articles

Debunking Myths about Thermochromic Glass

thermochromic myths debunked

In this blog, the staff at Pleotint is playing the role of “mythbusters,” and debunking three common myths about thermochromic glass..

  • The technology is not market-ready: This couldn’t be further from the truth. Not only is thermochromic glass a market-ready technology, it’s being featured on some high-profile projects. Take a look at these photos to see how buildings and homes are incorporating the Suntuitive interlayer in their glazing systems.
  • It makes glass opaque: When some people hear the word, “thermochromic,” they think of those groovy mood rings that were popular in the 1970s. The “gemstones” are really quartz or glass capsules, filled with a thermochromic element that changes color based on body heat. Their appearance is opaque, meaning you can’t see through them. Unfortunately, some people now associate thermochromic with being opaque. The truth is, thermochromic glass gradually darkens in response to rising temperatures caused by direct sunlight, but it remains completely transparent. Watch this video for a demonstration.
  • It only controls visible light: Thermochromic glass optimizes visible light for daylighting purposes—but it also helps control invisible light. Without getting too technical, the chemistry behind thermochromic glass blocks the passage of ultraviolet light, which is invisible electromagnetic radiation that fades carpet, paintings, and furniture. What’s more, when paired in a window with low-e glass, the two drastically reduce unwanted infrared light (or invisible heat energy from the sun) from entering a home or office.

Do you have any other myths that you’d like us to discuss? Leave them in the comment section.

Related Articles